Iran’s election is a chance for the government to show it can deliver the changes its critics were expecting

Analysis: Iran pushes militarily abroad amid unrest at home

Iran holds a general election on June 14 that will be seen as a test of its commitment to the country, its economy and the world.

The election is seen as a chance for the government to show it can deliver the changes its critics were expecting in the aftermath of Tehran’s disputed nuclear deal with world powers.

Fears of an uprising against the government in Iran, already in its sixth year of protests, were stoked on Tuesday by a mass shooting in the southwestern city of Kerman. Authorities blamed it on fanatics linked to President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, who has repeatedly said he wants to bring to power a “national salvation” government.

Rioting continues in Iran following a day of protests that authorities blamed on a fanatical militia linked to the country’s president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. (Reuters)

The U.S. State Department added its voice to the criticism by voicing concern over the “deterioration” of government reforms after some of its own citizens were arrested or detained for taking part in the protests.

Here’s a look at some of the key issues at stake:

WHAT IS THE ELECTION?

Iran’s Guardian Council on Wednesday approved a law that requires the casting of a national vote for the country’s first presidential election since 1979. The Guardian Council also set an upper limit of 10 percent of the national electorate, after a debate that prompted the resignation of the country’s two most conservative leaders, Hashemi Rafsanjani and Mohammad-Baqer Qalibaf.

Iran’s Guardian Council on Wednesday approved a law that requires the casting of a national vote for the country’s first presidential election since 1979. The Guardian Council also set an upper limit of 10 percent of the national electorate, after a debate that prompted the resignation of the country’s two most conservative leaders, Hashemi Rafsanjani and Mohammad-Baqer Qalibaf. (Associated Press)

Iran’s state TV did not announce the start of the election process, as it did in the run-up to the 2009 election. But state TV gave a live

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