Senate Vote Rejects Oil and Gas Deal

After bipartisan rebuff, Manchin abandons private legislative deal to help fossil fuel projects

By Bill McKibben

12 January 2018

The Senate’s vote to reject the private-sector deal to help the oil and gas industry was a rebuke of the Obama administration’s betrayal of the American people and the Democratic Party and the betrayal by many Democrats of the interests of the working class.

The Obama administration, on the other hand, has spent the past five years selling off the working class to the corporate bosses and the fossil fuel industry.

The vote, which was carried by a majority of 56 to 43 over opposition from the Republicans and four Democrats, sends the message that the Senate will stand firm in its opposition to any more corporate giveaways and any deals that reward the Trump White House and the oil and gas industry with more tax revenue and more favorable regulatory treatment.

The rejection of the deal was followed by an announcement from the administration that it would delay a final rule from the EPA that would reduce the amount of toxic chemicals that the industry can pump out into the air and water. It will instead require a two-year delay to give the industry time to write its own pollution control regulations, in line with the Trump administration’s determination to allow “polluters to continue polluting.”

The rejection of the deal was followed by an announcement from the administration that it would delay a final rule from the EPA that would reduce the amount of toxic chemicals that the industry can pump out into the air and water. It will instead require a two-year delay to give the industry time to write its own pollution control regulations, in line with the Trump administration’s determination to allow “polluters to continue polluting.”

The rejection of the deal was followed by an announcement from the administration that it would delay a final rule from the EPA that would reduce the amount of toxic chemicals that the industry can pump out into the air and water. It will instead require a two-year delay to give the industry time to write its own pollution control

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