The Gospel if not a book

Letters to the Editor: If you binge watch TV, you have time to read a ‘long’ book like this one.

I was surprised to find out from the New York Public Library that the two books “A Season in Purgatory” and “The New Testament of Philip the Evangelist” were not on their shelves as “required material for all students” and that any student who brought them into the University Library had to return them on their way out (as of Jan. 1, 2014). As I was reading “A Season in Purgatory,” I wondered how this book could be required. The only explanation I could come up with was in the title of the book: “What is the Gospel if not a book?”

That is a good question. The Gospel according to Philip is a book. How can it be required? Philip the Evangelist is also a book. How can it be required? Philip the Evangelist is also a book. How can it be required? The “Gospel According to Philip” is a book. How can it be required? The “Gospel According to Philip” is also a book. How can it be required? Because those who are allowed to read the Gospel in the New Testament “required book” do not read the Gospel that was given to Philip.

When I saw in the New York Public Library that “A Season in Purgatory” was not on the shelves as a required book, I asked the Library about that. The Library wrote back to me: “When the New York Public Library first began adding these books to our collection, we had a strong push to make sure that all texts were available to all in the collections. We’ve been disappointed to see the books go out of our collections, but we are trying to find the right balance between making sure that every single text is accessible in the Library’s collection and also that the selection reflects the best of the Library’s current reading materials.”

Well, if “A Season in Purgatory” is not included among “required books,” then how can it be included among the “books” that students are allowed to bring into the University Library? If “A Season in Purgatory” is not included among “required books,” then how can it be included among the “books” that students are allowed to bring into the University Library?

A recent New York Times article about “The Great Book Caper” (the story of

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