The New California Law Removes the Word “Squaw” From Place Names

New law will remove the word ‘squaw’ from California place names

‘Takima’

By Steve Leininger

Updated

12:20 am CDT, Wednesday, June 15, 2018

In November 2016, a new law took effect that removes the word “squaw” from California place names. The law was designed to make sure the country’s Native American tribes are not confused with other indigenous people, including the Yurok, Yana’a, and Wintu or Umatilla tribes. A new study suggests that the change has been effective.

In November 2016, a new law took effect that removes the word “squaw” from California place names. The law was designed to make sure the country’s Native American tribes are not confused with other indigenous people, including the Yurok, Yana’a, and Wintu or Umatilla tribes. A new study suggests that the change has been effective. Steve Leininger reports.

In November 2016, a new law took effect that removes the word “squaw” from California place names. The law was designed to make sure the country’s Native American tribes are not confused with other indigenous people, including the Yurok, Yana’a, and Wintu or Umatilla tribes. A new study suggests that the change has been effective. Steve Leininger reports.

In November 2016, a new law took effect that removes the word “squaw” from California place names. The law was designed to make sure the country’s Native American tribes are not confused with other indigenous people, including the Yurok, Yana’a, and Wintu or Umatilla tribes. A new study suggests that the change has been effective. Steve Leininger reports.

In November 2016, a new law took effect that removes the word “squaw” from California place names. The law was designed to make sure the country’s Native American tribes are not confused with other indigenous people, including the Yurok, Yana’a, and Wintu or Umatilla tribes. A new study suggests that the change has been effective. Steve Leininger reports.

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